Today I was in Kitsalano learning how to make my own beeswax food wraps, the new way to reduce waste while keeping your food fresh. This was a free workshop come to life thanks to a grant from “Neighbourhood small grants” (link below). Everyday folks like me and you submit their project/ideas. Each one is reviewed and the ones approved get up to $500 worth of funding, to see their plan to fruition. This is for non profit so they will always be free.

So today I was one of a handful signed up to learn how to make their own beeswax wrap. This was the environmentally friendly way to replace saran wrap, and help reduce the amount of plastic that ends up in the landfill.

This began as a passion project for our teacher/host Ellen. She was gifted a few such commercial grade cloths from a friend, and when looking to purchase more, found out how expensive they really were. So through trial and error she managed to recreate her own beeswax wraps. And today she was here to teach others how to do the same; and not only save money, but the environment too.

You begin by choosing your desired fabric in 100% cotton and cut it down to size. You pick and choose however large or small you need your piece(a) to be. A range of sizes is best to cover sauce dishes to casserole pans. There is no right or wrong size, only the size you need.

Next you shave and shred bricks of beeswax. You can get some from “Main Street Honey Shoppe”, and actually don’t need too much to coat a square of fabric. And the consistency and size of each curl doesn’t actually matter, as it will all be melted in the end.

Next you will need a hot iron, and a surface to iron on. Between two sheets of parchment paper you evenly sprinkle your shredded wax shavings over your desired cloth. One piece of wax paper at the bottom, and another over the cloth and the wax, on top.

You iron, melting the wax and dragging it across the entirety of the cloth. The goal is to have wax coat every inch of the fabric. And you only need to coat one side as the melted wax is fully absorbed into the cotton cloth.

After fully coated in wax, you remove your new beeswax cloth from in between the pieces of parchment and allow it to dry. They dry quick and you are ready to use it to wrap any thing right away. Any container, any leftover, any piece of half eaten fruit or vegetable. You can even use it to wrap crackers or small snacks in place of a zip lock bags. And the best part is that they are completely reusable. They keep for a year, or as long as you see fit. Ellen has been using hers for over a year now.

This was such a quick and easy workshop, and one that is useful for years to come. A d I hope you found this recap useful in recreating your own beeswax wrap.

And if you are interested in hosting your own small community project, visit the link below and fill out an application. The Vancouver Foundation works from February 9th to April 9th, so mark it on your calendars, and bookmark the page for other such projects to participate in for free.
http://neighbourhoodsmallgrants.ca/